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The Flirtatious Princess

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The Flirtatious Princess
The Flirtatious Princess.jpg
Start date: April 25th, 1949
End date: August 21st, 1949
# of strips: 102 daily strips &
17 sundays
Writer: Lee Falk
Artist: Wilson McCoy
Original colorist: KFS staff (sundays)
Preceded by: "Fathers and Sons"
Followed by: "The Thuggees"

"The Flirtatious Princess" is the 35th Phantom daily story and the 23rd Phantom Sunday story. The story was written by Lee Falk and drawn by Wilson McCoy.

Plot summary

King Pater’s daughter, Gwena promises to marry each of the rivalling dukes, Baron Gant and Duke Jorge, because she can’t make up her mind. Both dukes demand answers from King Pater after they find out of this- threatening to begin a war to win the daughter’s hand in marriage. Behind both men’s backs, Gwena flirts with Major Carl. During the war preparations, a bomb is accidentally dropped in the jungle and a native is killed. This persuades the phantom to go to Pathia. Meanwhile, Gant has kidnapped Gwena and makes a getaway. Following the pursuit, The Phantom jumps into Gant’s car and escapes with Gwena, evading both armies. He sends a messenger to Pater, who responds with sending Major Carl to go find her. Carl is captured by the Phantom. Gwena tries to flirt with the Phantom, so he pretends to have 300 wives already, and acts like a brute so that Carl will save her and escape. He does, and The Phantom arranges for them to be wed, to the disbelief of both Gant and Jorge.

Appearances

Recurring characters

One-time characters

  • King Pater of Pathia
  • Duke Jorge
  • Baron Gant
  • Princess Gwena of Pathia
  • Major Carl
  • Piko
  • Tanto of Bandar
  • The Chief of Llongo
  • The Chief of Onawey

Locations

Tribes

Jungle Festivities

  • The Spring Festival


Behind the scenes

Title panel.
  • The title "The Flirtatious Princess" appears in the first daily strip of the story.
  • Starting in February 1949 the Phantom Sundays and the Phantom daily strips featured the same stories. Unlike in the 1970's – where the stories "The Wedding of the Phantom", "The Three Bandits" and "The Heirs" ran both as dailies and Sundays – these adventures did not feature parallel stories but rather one story spanning over both weekdays and Sundays. However – since several newspapers only included either the Phantom dailies or the Phantom Sundays, the stories also had to be written in such way that the readers who didn't get both still were able to understand and appreciate the plot. As a result, the stories became quite repetitive when reading both Sundays and dailies, while the readers who only had access to either one of the two were left with some notable jumps in the storytelling. This practice was abandoned in May 1950, after four stories – "The Flirtatious Princess" being the second.
  • Princess Gwena tells The Phantom to marry her.
  • The jungle chiefs know about The Phantom's mortality, and are worried about him not getting a son.
  • The Kingdom of Pathia is said to border The Deep Woods, but Pathia's relationship to Bengali isn't mentioned.

Related stories

Remade as

Reprints

This story has been published in the following publications:

Mini argentina.gif Argentina

  • "La princesa frívola", Tit-Bits #2157 – #2173 (1950) - dailies only
  • "La princesa inconstante", La Sombra #10 (1959) - dailies only
  • "La princesa coqueta", El Fantasma #67 (1964) - Sundays only

Mini australia.gif Australia

Mini brazil.gif Brazil

Mini canada.gif Canada

  • La Patrie April 25, 1949 – August 21, 1949 - both Sundays and dailies
  • Le Nouvelliste April 30, 1949 – August 20, 1949 - Sundays only
  • Le Soleil May 1, 1949 – August 21, 1949 - Sundays only
  • L'Action catholique June 15, 1949 – October 17, 1949 - dailies only

Mini denmark.gif Denmark

  • "Den flirtende prinsesse", Hejmdal January 25, 1951 – May 29, 1951 - dailies only
  • "Duel i junglen", Fantomet pocket #3 (1984) - dailies only

Mini finland.gif Finland

Mini france.gif France

Mini ireland.gif Ireland

Mini italy.gif Italy

Mini mexico.gif Mexico

  • "La princesa coqueta", El Informador June 20, 1949 – October 16, 1949 - both Sundays and dailies
  • "La princesa coqueta", Paquito #10004 (1953) - dailies only
  • "La princesa coqueta", El Fantasma #16 (1966) - Sundays only

Mini nz.png New Zealand

Mini norway.gif Norway

Mini spainunderfranco.gif Mini spain.gif Spain

Mini sweden.gif Sweden

Mini turkey.gif Turkey

Mini usa.gif USA

Mini germany.gif West Germany